GOOD POINT

GOOD POINT

04/27/2012

Time and time again I have seen advertisements on why today’s children are obese. I was sitting here watching HBO and there was a commercial about some program coming on discussing children and obesity. Then, as I am doing my usual social media addiction work, I find something someone shared that totally makes sense.

Sure there are reasons why anyone struggles with obesity. Could be health problems, depression, chemical imbalances, lots of things. The post that was shared though was based on something that cannot be argued.

Let’s face it…kids don’t have a lot of money usually unless their parents are just handing it out left and right. I came from a family where I worked for my money. I had my first job when I was 16 and worked since. I bought every car I have owned, despite the first one I only paid $700.00 for. I am thankful for this because I have learned to appreciate things so much more.

I try to avoid fast food myself at all costs because I have struggled with my own weight. Seems everything I try doesn’t work. Avoiding fast food has been a big help, though. As you look at the menu these days, the salads on a menu are $5-6, while you can get a burger combo or even just a burger for a buck. Not only is fast food convenient but the worst things for you are the cheapest. Now this makes total sense because you shouldn’t have to pay for garbage that you are putting in your body but a kid could eat four times having a dollar burger than having a healthy salad.

A lot of blame goes to the parents for letting their children eat whatever they want. While I am sure a lot of that goes on, there are way more evident reasons for children making the decisions they do. When I was a kid, I didn’t like salads so probably no matter what price they were, I wouldn’t have bought one anyway. Back in those days though, salads weren’t usually something you could order at a fast food restaurant.

So this all boils down to is it really a child’s fault for their obesity? I feel that there are some poor decisions that are made by children sure and their parents and whoever else is to blame. I can so see the reasoning behind any child that would make a decision to go a cheaper route for a meal, especially if, to them, it achieves the same thing.

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EMOTIONAL CONCOCTION

04/18/2012

 

EMOTIONAL CONCOCTION

 

Over the past few months, since one of our friends adopted a new little boy, I have debated over the idea of adoption.  While it would make my heart so happy to know that my husband and I could give a child a home that otherwise they would’ve never had, it pains me to know the intricacy of how the story began and the pages were added.

 

I was thinking this morning as I was getting my day started (did you see the smoke??) of all the stories I have heard about telling the child, not telling the child, etc.  I have thought about whether I would want “closed” adoption or open.  I then thought to myself well what if we told our child and they decided they didn’t like us and wanted to go find their “real” parents?  I know there are lots of things that I don’t know about adoption and would need to do tons of research before it would be a go.

 

I tried to put myself in those shoes.  Would I have wanted my parents to tell me?  How would I have felt?  I can only imagine the depression that would’ve been involved knowing that my parents didn’t want me.  I think I would be hard in the beginning for me to see that it could have been they “couldn’t” make it work for me.  They couldn’t support me.  Then I would start getting confused about why they made a decision to have me and then give me away.

 

While there is an emotional conundrum out there in reference to adoption and know that the more I read the more nervous and confused I will get, I would love to make a child’s world.  I know it’s not the same but my husband and I rescued a cat once and it has been just as amazing as the one that is now 17 and was given to me by a good friend in high school.  I can only imagine what it would be like to make a child’s life something it may have never been.